Getting Bikes to People Who Need Them (Updated)

13 Oct

The standard “face” of biking in Richmond is probably a VCU student — at least in the photos that tend to appear alongside stories on the Floyd Avenue bike boulevard.  A big percentage of cyclists and advocates (though certainly not all) are white, middle-class men.  And a lot of what I write here, I admit, is directed toward people who might choose to ride a bicycle instead of driving.

But there are lot of low income Richmonders who do not have many other options: depending on where you want to go and when, walking or biking — possibly combined with a bus ride — can be the only real option for getting to work, to the store, or to visit people.  As I’ve noted here many times, a car is a more significant expense than we often realize: between 7 and 11 thousand dollars a year.

Two things made me think about this recently.  One is this Washington Post story that appeared about a week ago — part of a series about efforts to reduce poverty in Richmond.  The first installment introduced readers to Jarrell Miller, a Richmond man who, with help from the city’s Center for Workforce Innovation, was trying for several months to find a job (see an RTD piece on the Center here).  Jarrell did eventually find a job at a nightclub, but his workday ends at around 4 in the morning, when no GRTC buses are running.  So for a time he spent over an hour walking home from work in the pre-dawn hours.

Local bike advocate Amy George of Ride Richmond saw the article and put out the word: How can we get a bike for this person?  I don’t know the whole story behind it, but within 24 hours Jarrell was equipped with a bike, lock, and lights.*

*Today I got that back story courtesy of Brantley Tyndall of Ride Richmond: Brantley posted the request to the Ride Richmond Facebook page.  Brantley ended up working together with Daniel Pritchett, Whit Brooks of Riverside Outfitters,  city Bike-Ped Coordinator Jake Helmboldt, and Jamison Manion of the Center for Workforce Innovation to get Jarrell connected with a bike.  

Local Co-op Expanding

No doubt there are plenty of other people who could really use a bicycle too.  Besides buying a cheap or used one, the other option is Rag and Bones Bicycle Co-op.  In addition to learning to fix your bicycle and using their tools, you can exchange volunteer hours for a bicycle of your own.  Word is that a relationship between the co-op and the Center for Workforce Innovation might be in the works, which could help connect people who need transportation and those who can provide it.

Added to that is the news that Rag and Bones in opening a second location on Brookland Park Boulevard (their current location is in Scott’s Addition).  To help raise funds for the new location, Rag and Bones is hosting a benefit bike ride this coming Saturday, October 18.  Suggested donation $5-35.  The ride will go from their first location at 3110 W Leigh St to the new one on Brookland Park.  Meet at 2, ride at 3 — free coffee and pastries for riders!

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